Difference between revisions of "V3 ScratchPad"

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<b>Unless you are a Spathi or named Tyreth, please don't edit this document. Comments are welcome on the talk page. The "Effects" section of this document has been erased, the new and hopefully final version of effects will probably show up on the wiki before July 15.--drek</b>
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=Cliff Notes for v.3 Tech and Building Design=
  
=Meters & Infrastructure=
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=Meters and Resources=
Meters are variables attached to planets, representing the production capabilities and social attributes of each colonized world.  Future Note: There may eventually be “meters” associated with ships, ship parts, empires, and perhaps the galaxy itself.
+
  
Meters always range from 0-100. For greater granularity, meters can be modified in fractions of a full step. As a side note, the effects of a building or technology on a meter should almost always be expressed as integers (eg. "Superlabs gives +4 to research"), and the value of a meter should be rounded to the nearest integer on the UI.  
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Every planet’s got a bunch of meters, ranging in value from 0 to 100. Each meter’s got a max value and a current value. The current value slowly (each turn) increases until it matches the max value. The current value of each meter represents actual buildings, people, or whatever.
  
A meter with a value of 20 is at the "breakeven point". A world with Farming set to 20 can feed it's own population.  A world with Health at 20 doesn't lose or gain population.
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* Population -- how many people are on the planet.
 +
* Construction –represents roads, office towers, everything that doesn’t fit into other meters. Determines how fast the other meters rise.
 +
* Farming -- determines how much food is grown on the planet. 20 Farming is required for a planet to feed itself
 +
* Mining -- determines how many minerals are mined on the planet
 +
* Industry –determines how many minerals are ground up into Production Points
 +
* Science --determines the number of Research points generated
 +
* Trade --determines the amount of money generated
  
Planet Meters have both a Max value and a Current value. The Current Meter slowly increases until it matches the value of it's associated Max Meter. 
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There’s also the social meters. These meters only have a max value—they don’t slowly build up like the other meters:
  
The Max Meters can be thought of as potential infrastructure; the Current Meters represent this potential realized. Bonuses and penalties from foci, technologies, buildings, planet specials, and racial picks influence the Max Meters. Certain catastrophic events (such as bombings and earthquakes) modify the Current Meter, representing damage to actual infrastructure.
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* Health – determines how quickly population grows or shrinks. At 20 Health and below population shrinks.
 +
* Happiness – not used in v.3. Presumably, at 20 and below bad things happen.
 +
* Security – not used in v.3. At 20 and below, bad things happen.
  
After all Effects have executed, if a Meter falls outside the range of 0-100, the Meter is set to either 0 (if below 0) or 100 (if above 100).
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Just like v.2 of FreeOrion, the current values of each resource meter are multiplied with population to determine how much of each resource is generated. As in v.2, each resource meter (Farming, Mining, Industry, Science, Trade) can hold a Focus:
  
==Population==
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* Primary Focus adds + 15 to the selected Max Meter
 +
* Primary Balanced Focus adds +3 to all Max Resource Meters.
 +
* Secondary Specialized Focus adds +5 to the selected Max Meter
 +
* Secondary Balanced Focus adds +1 to all Max Resource Meters.
  
Unlike other meters, when a planet is first colonized, Current Population is set to 1.   At the start of the game each Homeworld's Current Population is set to 75% of Max Population.
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===Gameplay Considerations for meters===
 +
* New colonies suck. They can’t even feed themselves and they produce next to nothing. It takes a while before a new colony is an asset to the empire, instead of a liability. This is because no matter what it’s max meter is, it’s current meters require time to grow.
 +
* Colonies on worlds with poor environments really suck. They have poor Health and Farming—it isn’t worth colonizing a poor planet unless there’s a good strategic reason.
 +
* The homeworld rocks. It gets a bonus of +10 to most meters. The homeworld pays for the rest of the empire, in the first couple dozen turns of the game. Some early techs might *only* improve the homeworld.
 +
* All of the effects in the game (techs and buildings) put together should add up to somewhere in the neighborhood of 70 to 80 to each meter. (this leaves room for government and leader effects later on)
  
The Max Population on a planet is determined by planet size and environmental conditions, referenced on the following table:     
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===Gameplay considerations for food===
<table border=1 cellpadding=2 cellspacing=0>
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* Early game, there just isn’t enough food to go around. The player won’t be able to concentrate on rapid expansion until he solves the built-in food shortage.
<tr><td>&nbsp;<td>Terrible<td>Adequate<td>Optimal<td>Superb
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* An empire with 4x as much food as population receives Health and Happiness bonuses
<tr><td>Tiny<td>2<td>4<td>8<td>10
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<tr><td>Small<td>4<td>8<td>16<td>20
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<tr><td>Average<td>6<td>12<td>20<td>25
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<tr><td>Large<td>8<td>16<td>25<td>30
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<tr><td>Huge<td>10<td>20<td>30<td>35
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</table>
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Max Population can be further modified via planet specials, buildings, and technologies.
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===Gamplay Considerations for Focus===
 +
* Focus is how we judge if a planet should receive most bonuses. Most bonuses should only effect worlds of a certain focus. This means a Farming world will catch a lot more Farming bonuses than a world set to Mining.
  
Each turn, population is adjusted via the following formulas:
 
  
* If the Health Meter is above 20: Population Change = Current Population * ((Max Population - Current Population) / Max Population) * (Health Meter - 20) * (0.01)
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==Technology==
* If the Health Meter is equal to 20: Population Change=0
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* If the Health Meter is below 20: Population Change = Current Population * (Health Meter - 20) * (0.01)
+
  
Population Change is added to Current Population. If Current Population is over Max Population, then Current Population is reduced to match Max Population.
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Every tech is either a Theory or an Application. Theories unlock Applications; applications actually do stuff, unlock buildings, or unlock ship components.
  
If Current Population is reduced to 0, then a "Colony Destruction" event is spawned.  This event eliminates the colony, and notifies the player on the siterep.
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Techs cost X RP for Y Turns to research. There is no method of speeding up research: it always takes at least Y turns.
  
Note: The Homeworld special grants +10 to Max Population.
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===Gameplay Considerations for Foci improving Techs===
 +
* Most techs should improve a specific focus
 +
* Some techs should improve the balanced and secondary foci as well as the specific focus
  
==Construction Meter==
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===Gameplay Considerations for Early Techs===
The Construction Meter represents the general infrastructure of a planet. It is used to determine the growth rate of Current Meters.
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* The homeworld all by itself should be able to research early techs, meaning RP costs should range from 10 to 25. A tech that costs 25 RP per turn would require the homeworld be Focused on researching. Number of turns might range from 5 to 20.
 +
* Early techs should solve the food shortage problem, but not completely.
 +
* Early tech bonuses should be small.
  
New colonies begin with a Current Construction of 0. Each Homeworld begins the game with Current Construction equal to 75% of its Max Construction.
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===Gameplay Considerations for Mid Techs===
 +
* The assumption is that there will be multiple worlds at the same level as the homeworld in Mid Game, with tech bonuses. The average world that isn’t focused on Research will probably have a research score of 10. With focus, 20 to 40. A mid game tech should therefore probably cost 25 to 500 RP per turn.
 +
* Mid tech bonuses are all over the scale, but should mostly be significant.
  
By default, Max Construction is 20--it is further modified by the effects of buildings, technologies, racial picks, events, planet specials, etc.
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===Gameplay Considerations for Late Techs===
 +
* The empire will span dozens of worlds, each with high levels of tech bonuses. 500-3000 per turn sounds right.
 +
* High tech bonuses should actually be smaller than mid-game bonuses. The player is paying to be just a little bit better than the competition.
  
Each turn, Current Construction increments via the following formula:
 
  
Construction Change = (Current Construction + 1) * ((Max Construction - Current Construction) / Max Construction) * (Current Population + 50) * (0.01)
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==Buildings==
  
Construction Change is then added to Current Construction.
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Like Research Points, Production Points are pooled globally. Buildings, like techs, cost X PP for Y turns to build. Again, there is no method of speeding up a build: it always takes at least Y turns.
  
If Current Construction is greater than Max Construction, Current Construction is reduced to match Max Construction. This test should occur after all Effects have been executed.
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Buildings also have prerequisite conditions: generally based on the Focus of the planet and the current Construction meter. Nice buildings should not be buildable on newly colonized worlds.
  
Note: The Homeworld planet special adds +25 to Max Construction.
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Buildings have an upkeep: an amount of money they eat every turn.
 
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===Infrastructure Labels===
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Infrastructure Labels have no gameplay effect; the labels are meant to provide an easy method for players to quickly judge the progress of a colony.
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A label is selected for each planet based on Current Construction:
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* 1-10:  Rural Colony
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* 11-30: Developing World
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* 31-60: Established World
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* 61-90: Heavily Developed World
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* 91-100: Metroplex
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==The Resource Meters==
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Resource meters determine the quantity of resource production.  There is one resource meter for each type of resource in the game.
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On a new colony, all Current Resources Meters begin at 0.  At the start of the game, all Current Resource Meters on each empire’s Homeworld are set to 75% of the associated Max Resource Meters.
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For each planet, quantity of resource production is determined via the following formula:
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Resources Produced = (Current Resource Meter/10) * Current Population
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The Max Resource Meters are determined by the planet’s Focus settings.  (see Focus for details)  They are further modified by Effects from various Actors (including technologies, buildings, events, planet specials, and racial picks).
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+
Each turn, all Current Resource Meters increment via the following formula:
+
 
+
Meter Change = (Current Meter + 1) * ((Max Meter - Current Meter) / Max Meter) * (Current Construction) * (0.01)
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+
Meter Change is then added to the Current Resource Meter.
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+
If a Max Resource Meter is greater than it’s associated Current Meter, then the Current Meter is reduced to match the Max Meter.  This test should occur after all Effects have been executed.
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===Farming===
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Farming determines the amount of Nutrients a world produces. In addition to Focus and the effects of various Actors, this meter is heavily modified by environment:
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* Terrible Environments reduce Max Farming by 30.
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* Adequate Environments reduce Max Farming by 10.
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* Optimal Environments have no effect on the Farming meter.
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* Superb Environments increase Max Farming by 10.
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Note: the Homeworld special improves Max Farming by 20.
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===Mining===
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Mining determines the number of Minerals produced.  There will probably be planet specials that modify the Mineral meter, collectively known as the “Mineral Richness specials.” 
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Note: the Homeworld special improves Max Mining by 10.
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===Industry===
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Industry determines the Production Points (PP) generated by a world.  Each Industry point must be matched with a Mineral point to produce PP, as described in the Production section.  In addition to Focus and the effects of various Actors, this meter is modified by planet size:
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* Tiny worlds grant a +10 bonus to Max Industry, due to low gravity.
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* Small worlds grant a +5 bonus to Max Industry.
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* Normal sized worlds give no special modifiers to the Industry meter.
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* Large worlds reduce Max Industry by 5, due to heavy gravity.
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* Huge worlds reduce Max Industry by 10.
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Note: the Homeworld special improves Max Industry by 10.
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===Science===
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Science determines the Research generated by a world. In the future, government picks will probably have a significant influence on this meter.  "Scientifically interesting” planet specials might modify this meter. 
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Note: the Homeworld special improves Max Science by 10.
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===Trade===
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Trade determines the Money extracted from a world. In the future, government picks will probably have a significant influence on this meter.  “Valuable commodity” planet specials might modify this meter.
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Note: the Homeworld special improves Max Trade by 10.
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==The Social Meters==
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Unlike the Resource meters, Social meters don’t have separate Max and Current values.  Effects always operate on the Current Social Meter.
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===Health===
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Health governs the growth rate of population.  The Health Meter is based on the Environment of the planet, and can be modified through the usual set of Actors.  The Health meter is also heavily influenced by Nutrient Rating, as described in the Nutrient Distribution section.
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* Terrible Environments add +30 to the Health meter.
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* Adequate Environments add +40 to the Health meter.
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* Optimal Environments add +50 to the Health meter.
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* Superb Environments add +60 to the Health meter.
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+
The Health Meter is used by the Population growth formula.  As a note, if the Health Meter is below 25, population growth should be negative.
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Note: The Homeworld special improves Health by 10.
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===Suggested Future Social Meters===
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'''Happiness:''' Happiness guards against unrest events. It is not used in v.3.
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'''Security:''' Security lowers the duration of unrest events, guards against piracy events, and guards against enemy espionage. It is not used in v.3
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+
 
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=Planet Focus=
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<b>Note: This section is a suggested amendment to the current design document.</b>
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The player can assign a Primary and Secondary Focus on every colonized planet, representing which resources the planet is "focused" on producing.
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The values of the Max Resource Meters are determined by Focus settings. Both Foci can be independently set to one of the five resource meters or the "Balanced" setting.
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New colonies begin with both the Primary and Secondary Focus set to Balanced.  The Homeworld begins the game with Primary set to Balanced and Secondary to Farming.
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==Focus Effects on Max Resource Meters==
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Focus settings have these effects on max meter values:
+
 
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* Primary Focus adds + 15 to the selected Max Meter
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* Primary Balanced Focus adds +3 to all Max Resource Meters.
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* Secondary Specialized Focus adds +5 to the selected Max Meter
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* Secondary Balanced Focus adds +1 to all Max Resource Meters.
+
  
Some technologies and buildings effectively increase the bonus applied by Primary Focus. See Effects for details.
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===General Gameplay considerations for buildings===
 +
* Buildings in FO are in fact Wonder-sized structures. Massive costs to build, massive costs to maintain. There should be one to two buildings per planet. Most planets will have 0 buildings—as it makes sense to concentrate buildings on a few “hub” planets.
 +
* Buildings are generally Area-of-effect. Many buildings improve all planets within the same starsystem, or all planets within 1 or 2 starlane hops away.
 +
* This creates clusters: if the player builds a building that improves Science focused worlds, he’ll want to set many of the planets within the area of effect to the “Science” focus. The player must micromanage his buildings’ locations, so that his total empire has as few wasteful overlaps as possible, much like the schools and firestations in SimCity.
 +
* Many buildings also have negative side-effects. The player must micromanage his building’s locations to avoid the worst of the negative effects.
 +
* A planet with a nice building is also a nice target for attack. You can take out the economy of an entire cluster if you take all the worlds with buildings.
  
'''Legacy Note''': In version .2, every colony produced a little of each type of resource, thanks to bonuses to every "meter" from the Focus settings. In v.3,  worlds still produce a little of everything, once the proper techs are researched and buildings constructed. Essentially, the player has to earn the old v.2 bonuses through research and build projects. The assumption is that many of these resource improvements will be low tech, esp. in the Farming, Industry, and Mineral catagories.
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===Early Buildings===
 +
*There should be very few early buildings.
 +
*Early buildings should be buildable by the homeworld acting alone. For this reason, early buildings need a build cost of 10 to 25 per turn.
 +
*Early buildings should be maintainable by the homeworld acting alone. Maintaince of 0 to 12. There needs to be some money held back for ship upkeeps.
 +
*Early buildings should have small effects and severe negative side effects. This is so the player isn’t tempted to populate his entire late game empire with early buildings.
  
=Nutrient Distribution=
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===Mid Buildings===
<b>Note: Need a public review or something for Nutrient Distribution. There might be different ideas on how to do this thing.</b>
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*Cost per turn and maintaince of 25 to 500. Maintaince should be controlled, to so there’s some money left over for ship upkeeps.
 +
* Effects can be better, side effects much less severe, but still something the player needs to micromanage.
  
Each unit of population requires Nutrients in order to survive. One point of Nutrients is required for basic survival; two points allow normal health; four points grant good health.
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===Late Buildings===
 +
* Cost 500 to 3000.
 +
* Effects are generally small, but with few or no negative side effects.
 +
* There can be “game changing” buildings, but they should have huge negatives.
  
Nutrient Distribution must occur after resource generation, but before population growth is checked. 
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==Effects==
  
Each planet has a Nutrient Rating similair to in function to the Enviroment Rating. The Nutrient Rating is determined by dividing Local Nutrients with Population:
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There are three basic kinds of effects…tech effects are empire wide, building effects tend to be area-of-effect (with frequent exceptions), specials tend to have effects that only operate on a single planet.
  
* If Nutrient Rating is 4 or above, the planet is "Well-fed."  Health and Happiness increase by 10.
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Effects can be “targeted” to only operate on certain kinds of planets, as explained in the [[Effects]] document. For example, you might have a building that only operates on enemy worlds within 2 starlane hops. Or a building that only effects planets orbiting a yellow star.
* If Nutrient Rating is 2 or above (but less than 4), the planet is "Adequately fed".  Health and Happiness are unchanged.
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* If Nutrient Rating is 1 or above (but less than 2), the planet is "Poorly fed."  Health and Happiness are reduced by 10.
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* If Nutrient Rating is less than 1, then the planet is "Starving."  Health and Happiness are reduced by 50.  In addition, Health is capped at 20.
+
  
During the resource generation phase of a turn, planets with more Nutrients than twice their Current Population export the excess Nutrients to the global stockpile.
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Most good effects should be targeted to effect planets with a certain focus. Techs should probably never have bad side effects, since the player can’t get rid of a researched technology.
  
During the Nutrient Distribution phase, planets that are "Starving" can import Nutrients from this stockpile to make up for shortfalls.   In the first pass, planets import just enough food to reach the "Poorly fed" rating.  If, after this first pass there are still Nutrients remaining in the global stockpile, then a second pass is run.  During this second pass, planets import just enough food to reach the "Adequate" rating.   A third pass is then run, with planets importing just enough food to reach the "Well-fed" rating.
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===Some ideas for negative side effects===
 +
* A building that gives bonuses to enemy worlds as well as friendly worlds
 +
* A building that spawns bad events on nearby worlds (a MegaFactory that produces Pollution.)
 +
* A building that drastically reduces a meter value on the planet that holds it (a massive strip mining operation annihilates Farming, reducing it to 0)
 +
* A building that “hates” a certain Focus, causing huge negatives if any planets with that focus are nearby.
 +
* A building that “hates” another building, causing huge negatives if they are next to each other.
  
Planets import food in order of colony age.  The oldest worlds get first dibs.
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===Some ideas for positive effects beyond simple bonuses===
 +
* A building that gives bonuses to an unrelated meter for a Focused world (a BioLab that improves Farming on Science focused worlds)
 +
* A building that removes bad events on nearby worlds (removing the MegaFactory’s pollution, for example)
 +
* A building that spawns good events on nearby worlds (a baby factory that spawns Population Explosion events)
 +
* A building that adds directly to the empire’s stockpile, skirting around the population*resource formula
 +
* A building that only gives bonuses to planets that have another kind of building
 +
* A building that gives penalties to enemy worlds as well as friendly worlds. Something to stick on the border of your hated enemy.
  
Future note:  Planets that are "blockcaded" cannot export or import resources.
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==Future notes==
 +
In v.4, we’ll have various kinds of shipyards and other kinds of buildings that effect ships.
 +
Happiness and security meters, along with the event engine and planet specials, will vastly increase the types of effect conditions that are possible…furthering complicating the micromanagement decisions the player will have to make.

Latest revision as of 05:01, 21 June 2006

Cliff Notes for v.3 Tech and Building Design

Meters and Resources

Every planet’s got a bunch of meters, ranging in value from 0 to 100. Each meter’s got a max value and a current value. The current value slowly (each turn) increases until it matches the max value. The current value of each meter represents actual buildings, people, or whatever.

  • Population -- how many people are on the planet.
  • Construction –represents roads, office towers, everything that doesn’t fit into other meters. Determines how fast the other meters rise.
  • Farming -- determines how much food is grown on the planet. 20 Farming is required for a planet to feed itself
  • Mining -- determines how many minerals are mined on the planet
  • Industry –determines how many minerals are ground up into Production Points
  • Science --determines the number of Research points generated
  • Trade --determines the amount of money generated

There’s also the social meters. These meters only have a max value—they don’t slowly build up like the other meters:

  • Health – determines how quickly population grows or shrinks. At 20 Health and below population shrinks.
  • Happiness – not used in v.3. Presumably, at 20 and below bad things happen.
  • Security – not used in v.3. At 20 and below, bad things happen.

Just like v.2 of FreeOrion, the current values of each resource meter are multiplied with population to determine how much of each resource is generated. As in v.2, each resource meter (Farming, Mining, Industry, Science, Trade) can hold a Focus:

  • Primary Focus adds + 15 to the selected Max Meter
  • Primary Balanced Focus adds +3 to all Max Resource Meters.
  • Secondary Specialized Focus adds +5 to the selected Max Meter
  • Secondary Balanced Focus adds +1 to all Max Resource Meters.

Gameplay Considerations for meters

  • New colonies suck. They can’t even feed themselves and they produce next to nothing. It takes a while before a new colony is an asset to the empire, instead of a liability. This is because no matter what it’s max meter is, it’s current meters require time to grow.
  • Colonies on worlds with poor environments really suck. They have poor Health and Farming—it isn’t worth colonizing a poor planet unless there’s a good strategic reason.
  • The homeworld rocks. It gets a bonus of +10 to most meters. The homeworld pays for the rest of the empire, in the first couple dozen turns of the game. Some early techs might *only* improve the homeworld.
  • All of the effects in the game (techs and buildings) put together should add up to somewhere in the neighborhood of 70 to 80 to each meter. (this leaves room for government and leader effects later on)

Gameplay considerations for food

  • Early game, there just isn’t enough food to go around. The player won’t be able to concentrate on rapid expansion until he solves the built-in food shortage.
  • An empire with 4x as much food as population receives Health and Happiness bonuses

Gamplay Considerations for Focus

  • Focus is how we judge if a planet should receive most bonuses. Most bonuses should only effect worlds of a certain focus. This means a Farming world will catch a lot more Farming bonuses than a world set to Mining.


Technology

Every tech is either a Theory or an Application. Theories unlock Applications; applications actually do stuff, unlock buildings, or unlock ship components.

Techs cost X RP for Y Turns to research. There is no method of speeding up research: it always takes at least Y turns.

Gameplay Considerations for Foci improving Techs

  • Most techs should improve a specific focus
  • Some techs should improve the balanced and secondary foci as well as the specific focus

Gameplay Considerations for Early Techs

  • The homeworld all by itself should be able to research early techs, meaning RP costs should range from 10 to 25. A tech that costs 25 RP per turn would require the homeworld be Focused on researching. Number of turns might range from 5 to 20.
  • Early techs should solve the food shortage problem, but not completely.
  • Early tech bonuses should be small.

Gameplay Considerations for Mid Techs

  • The assumption is that there will be multiple worlds at the same level as the homeworld in Mid Game, with tech bonuses. The average world that isn’t focused on Research will probably have a research score of 10. With focus, 20 to 40. A mid game tech should therefore probably cost 25 to 500 RP per turn.
  • Mid tech bonuses are all over the scale, but should mostly be significant.

Gameplay Considerations for Late Techs

  • The empire will span dozens of worlds, each with high levels of tech bonuses. 500-3000 per turn sounds right.
  • High tech bonuses should actually be smaller than mid-game bonuses. The player is paying to be just a little bit better than the competition.


Buildings

Like Research Points, Production Points are pooled globally. Buildings, like techs, cost X PP for Y turns to build. Again, there is no method of speeding up a build: it always takes at least Y turns.

Buildings also have prerequisite conditions: generally based on the Focus of the planet and the current Construction meter. Nice buildings should not be buildable on newly colonized worlds.

Buildings have an upkeep: an amount of money they eat every turn.

General Gameplay considerations for buildings

  • Buildings in FO are in fact Wonder-sized structures. Massive costs to build, massive costs to maintain. There should be one to two buildings per planet. Most planets will have 0 buildings—as it makes sense to concentrate buildings on a few “hub” planets.
  • Buildings are generally Area-of-effect. Many buildings improve all planets within the same starsystem, or all planets within 1 or 2 starlane hops away.
  • This creates clusters: if the player builds a building that improves Science focused worlds, he’ll want to set many of the planets within the area of effect to the “Science” focus. The player must micromanage his buildings’ locations, so that his total empire has as few wasteful overlaps as possible, much like the schools and firestations in SimCity.
  • Many buildings also have negative side-effects. The player must micromanage his building’s locations to avoid the worst of the negative effects.
  • A planet with a nice building is also a nice target for attack. You can take out the economy of an entire cluster if you take all the worlds with buildings.

Early Buildings

  • There should be very few early buildings.
  • Early buildings should be buildable by the homeworld acting alone. For this reason, early buildings need a build cost of 10 to 25 per turn.
  • Early buildings should be maintainable by the homeworld acting alone. Maintaince of 0 to 12. There needs to be some money held back for ship upkeeps.
  • Early buildings should have small effects and severe negative side effects. This is so the player isn’t tempted to populate his entire late game empire with early buildings.

Mid Buildings

  • Cost per turn and maintaince of 25 to 500. Maintaince should be controlled, to so there’s some money left over for ship upkeeps.
  • Effects can be better, side effects much less severe, but still something the player needs to micromanage.

Late Buildings

  • Cost 500 to 3000.
  • Effects are generally small, but with few or no negative side effects.
  • There can be “game changing” buildings, but they should have huge negatives.

Effects

There are three basic kinds of effects…tech effects are empire wide, building effects tend to be area-of-effect (with frequent exceptions), specials tend to have effects that only operate on a single planet.

Effects can be “targeted” to only operate on certain kinds of planets, as explained in the Effects document. For example, you might have a building that only operates on enemy worlds within 2 starlane hops. Or a building that only effects planets orbiting a yellow star.

Most good effects should be targeted to effect planets with a certain focus. Techs should probably never have bad side effects, since the player can’t get rid of a researched technology.

Some ideas for negative side effects

  • A building that gives bonuses to enemy worlds as well as friendly worlds
  • A building that spawns bad events on nearby worlds (a MegaFactory that produces Pollution.)
  • A building that drastically reduces a meter value on the planet that holds it (a massive strip mining operation annihilates Farming, reducing it to 0)
  • A building that “hates” a certain Focus, causing huge negatives if any planets with that focus are nearby.
  • A building that “hates” another building, causing huge negatives if they are next to each other.

Some ideas for positive effects beyond simple bonuses

  • A building that gives bonuses to an unrelated meter for a Focused world (a BioLab that improves Farming on Science focused worlds)
  • A building that removes bad events on nearby worlds (removing the MegaFactory’s pollution, for example)
  • A building that spawns good events on nearby worlds (a baby factory that spawns Population Explosion events)
  • A building that adds directly to the empire’s stockpile, skirting around the population*resource formula
  • A building that only gives bonuses to planets that have another kind of building
  • A building that gives penalties to enemy worlds as well as friendly worlds. Something to stick on the border of your hated enemy.

Future notes

In v.4, we’ll have various kinds of shipyards and other kinds of buildings that effect ships. Happiness and security meters, along with the event engine and planet specials, will vastly increase the types of effect conditions that are possible…furthering complicating the micromanagement decisions the player will have to make.